RESOLUTION EVC 121

FORUM: ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE

QUESTION OF: Combatting the main threats to wild natural areas

SUBMITTED BY: China

CO-SUBMITTERS:Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Greece, Denmark, Iceland, Slovakia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Latvia, UNEP ( Environment), World Bank.

STATUSPassed

THE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE,

 

Expressing its appreciation of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) which states that it focuses on “the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources”,

Guided by the China Ecological Conservation Redline (ECRL) strategy which focuses on the systematic and mandatory protection of fragile zones, biodiversity, and natural landscapes within set boundaries and ensures sustainable conservation through a more systematic approach and overall better process management,

Recognizing the definition of the term “protected area”, as defined by International Union for  Conservation of Nature (IUCN),  as “a clearly defined geographical space, recognised, dedicated and managed, through legal or other effective means, to achieve the long term conservation of nature with associated ecosystem services and cultural values”,

Keeping in mind the importance of protected areas as they play a big role in maintaining food and water safety and quality, conserving biodiversity, preserving natural habitats, combating climate change, and many more environmental issues,

Expecting all Member States who have not ratified the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to do so in order to not only protect certain natural areas, but also to protect the environment outside these areas to tackle issues such as but not limited to climate change, gas emissions, and disposal of hazardous waste which will reduce outside causes of detrimental effects on said areas to a minimum,

  1. Strongly encourages all Member States to establish new laws and strengthen previous ones on the protection of wild natural areas on both an international and a country-based level which will:
    1. determine regions and areas that need protection and the borders of where the following precautions will be taken, which, after being decided upon by central governments of each Member State, will be confirmed by United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
    2. introduce bans or privatization on national and international companies to prevent detrimental actions in protected areas such as but not limited to building factories, mining, and disposing of hazardous waste
    3. Prohibit traditional forms of tourism and instead encourage regulated ecotourism in these areas so as to conserve a balance between the environmental and economic importance of wild natural areas
    4. restrict governments from carrying out actions damaging protected areas such as building roads, installing power lines, and constructing settlements
    5. establish penalties such as increasing taxes based on the financial status of each country and fines and immediately halting any illegal action in the area if said laws are disobeyed;
  2. Suggests that each Member State holds annual meetings in their respective ministries regarding the preservation of nature to discuss issues such as official borders of protected areas in the state and a country-specific preservation plan similar to the China Ecological Conservation Redline (ECR) which they will form in order to:
    1. establish an official long-term plan to preserve said areas
    2. strengthen the steps that have been suggested but have failed in the past due to lack of supervision as mentioned in clause 6
    3. set goals to protect said areas and ensure that effective measures are taken to reach said goals each year;
  3. Calls for the creation of a system around protected areas to reinforce the borders and assign experts appointed by UNEP to these regions in order to:
    1. carry out patrols in the area every three months to spot and prevent any illegal settlements or construction
    2. create annual reports regarding the state on topics such as but not limited to:
      1. any illegal activity and progressive or regressive change decided upon by the state
      2. approximately how much economic aid the state needs, if any at all, to carry out certain programmes
      3. guidance and suggestions on what can be done to improve the issue
      4. changes in population size and behavioural patterns of endangered or threatened species in the protected area;
  4. Further encourages the collaboration of Member States, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the World Bank in aiding and supporting LEDCs and countries in crises which have difficulty in funding certain programmes;
  5. Recommends that every Member State raise awareness in society, especially in regions near protected areas, in order to demonstrate the importance of protection of wild natural areas and how they are harmed by human activities by:
    1. integrating the topic into school curriculums in an age-appropriate manner to inform children from a young age and implementing a worldwide educational program where all can learn about the cultures, such as indigenous cultures, to respect and to support their efforts in protecting nature
    2. organizing seminars in public areas and in schools which will be conducted by experts to provide more detailed information regarding the issue
    3. displaying lots of public service announcements such as but not limited to brochures, fundraising events, and broadcasts
    4. sensitizing companies to use eco-friendly operations rather than methods which produce hazardous waste   
    5. collaborating with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and other environmentally important advocacy organizations to further bring awareness to the issue
    6. raising awareness of the impacts caused by the results of human activities and introducing methods to reduce individual impact;
  6. Calls upon all Member States to take part in a new international conference under the guidance of UNEP which will be held annually where the following topics will be discussed:
    1. the country-specific reports written by experts, mentioned in clause 2 regarding:
      1. whether the states are taking necessary measures such as the implementation of laws and precautions
      2. whether there has been any illegal activity throughout the year in protected areas
      3. what the governments have done to prevent said illegal activities
    2. the long-term goals each state decided upon, mentioned in Clause 3: states will discuss how achievable the goals are, keeping in mind the effects they would have on the protected areas, in the case that:
      1. it is decided by a P5 country that a state’s plan needs improvement, they will be given the option to discuss and establish new goals with the supervision of specialized advisors who will be chosen from exemplary states and will then be confirmed by UNEP,
      2. a state is lacking the economic resources to carry out effective steps toward their goals, they will be encouraged to consult IMF or the World Bank
    3. a comparison between long-term goals of states and their annual reports to decide whether:
      1. necessary measures have been taken in order to achieve said goals
      2. the economic aid that has been requested is being used for the right cause
      3. there is need for further economic aid
    4. the implementation of sanctions and penalties on any Member State who does not fulfil their obligations in taking action to reduce the harm on wild natural areas;
  7. Encourages governments of Member Nations to set up coastal clean-up teams within their nation to combat the huge issue of plastic pollution in water bodies, which is severely damaging ecosystems and WNAs;
  8.  Invites international cooperation to mitigate anthropogenic impacts on marine ecosystems through ways such as but not limited to: 
    1.  setting up coastal cleanup teams by collaborating with relevant international organizations to combat marine pollution,
    2. mitigating exhausted wild fisheries through ways such as but not limited to:
      1.  facilitating the negotiation of a legally binding agreement to govern high-seas conservation by The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea,
      2. promoting the use of integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) while holding accountable its potential drawbacks through governmental oversight agencies,
      3.  categorizing harmful fishing practices and devise policies to prevent subsidies on these practices,
      4. affirming the efforts of regional fisheries management organizations.
  9.  Invites international cooperation to mitigate anthropogenic impacts on marine ecosystems through ways such as but not limited to: 
    1.  setting up coastal cleanup teams by collaborating with relevant international organizations to combat marine pollution,
    2. mitigating exhausted wild fisheries through ways such as but not limited to:
      1.  facilitating the negotiation of a legally binding agreement to govern high-seas conservation by The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea,
      2. promoting the use of integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) while holding accountable its potential drawbacks through governmental oversight agencies,
      3.  categorizing harmful fishing practices and devise policies to prevent subsidies on these practices,
      4. affirming the efforts of regional fisheries management organizations;